• Captain Dave

These boats are made for sailing

Updated: Dec 16, 2019

Many people who live along a coast probably fantasize about owning a boat one day. I mean, if you are a stone’s throw away from the beach or the view outside of your living room window is a marina, how could this NOT be a dream of yours? As for me, I was born and raised in Southern California so my first word could have easily been boat related. Fast forward to adulthood, where I can finally cross owning a boat off the good old bucket list.


I take pride in my yacht so I am constantly giving her the TLC she both deserves and requires. One thing that puzzles me is the fact that I am surrounded by boats that never leave the dock. Large, beautiful ships that collect dust and rock gently back and forth whenever waves brush up against their sides. This observation always begs the question, why own a boat if you are never going to use it? This situation is akin to gym memberships. While I am sweating my ass off on the treadmill, I look around and notice others sitting at weight machines talking on their phones or standing in front of mirrors taking selfies to post on their social channels. Scrolling through Instagram, do you ever wonder why everyone looks so beautiful and dry after a “workout”?



Anyway, I have a few theories as to why these lonely boats are tied up around the clock. One thought is that while waterfront real estate is usually reserved for millionaires, some boat owners view their yachts as bargain beach houses: invite friends over, serve hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, sunbathe, blast Bob Marley through your recently installed surround sound system, and watch the sun go down. While this sounds like a perfectly good time, boats are made for the open ocean.


Another idea is that people might purchase more boat than they can handle. If the sky is the limit and your pockets run deep, how could you pass on the luxurious Sunseeker 131 yacht? Beautiful master suite, a chef’s kitchen, formal dining room, built-in bar, and an open-concept floor plan leading out onto one of several sun-soaked decks. It is a mobile, 5-star hotel on the water! Several “house” parties later, the reality of your purchase might settle in and suddenly you find yourself overwhelmed and intimidated by your own boat; the thought of driving it makes you light-headed and weak in the knees. The good news about this theory is that you can always solve it by hiring a captain (shameless plug for my skipper service) so that you can sit back and enjoy the ride.


Last but certainly not least, many still view boating as a male hobby even though women also enjoy water sports, fishing, and boating. If you are a male boat owner who is baffled by your female cohort’s reluctance to sail with you every weekend, consider the type of ship and its furnishings. Picture this: excitedly pulling up to greet your wife and kids at the dock in your brand new “go-fast” boat only to be met by confused frowning faces and, ultimately, a boat that is permanently docked at the marina. Are you really shocked that no one’s vision of boating includes riding at breakneck speeds, wearing helmets, and having no place to pee? If you enjoy the company of others, then buy a sailboat with comfortable seat cushions, maybe a sunshade over the cockpit, upscale plasticware that includes wine glasses, a beer and wine stocked fridge, snacks, pillows, blankets, and other items that would entice, rather than repel, others to join you on your excursions.


The bottom line is that boats are designed for the open ocean. Whatever the reason is behind your stationary vessel, there’s always a solution to get it moving again. Perhaps you need to do a little soul-searching to rediscover the joys of being a boat owner: get back to why you bought it in the first place. Heck, it’s summertime now. Get out there and use that boat!


If your boat never leaves the dock, what’s your excuse? Comment below.